Matty’s upcoming schedule

Matty Stratton is presenting at these upcoming events.

Helsinki, Finland

Microsoft TechDays 2019 - Finland

How Do You Infect Your Organization With Humane Ops?

Richard Dawkins described memes as being a form of cultural propagation, which is a way for people to transmit social memories and cultural ideas to each other. Not unlike the way that DNA and life will spread from location to location, a meme idea will also travel from mind to mind.

Getting your organization to take a step back and look at how ops affects people (awareness of alert fatigue, burnout risk, proactive/reactive approaches) can be a tough challenge.

In this talk, I will discuss how the very DNA of an organization can evolve through the use of actionable communications from all levels - management, strategy, and practitioners. The “virus” of humane ops will infect your organization, providing a more sustainable approach to on-call, incident resolution, post-mortems, and more. There also will be copious references to the Neal Stephenson classic novel, Snow Crash.

After this talk, you will have ideas of practical approaches to effect change in your organization, regardless of your level of influence. While not every group will use the same “viruses”, you will take away a good understanding of where to get started as Patient Zero.

28 February 2019

Pasadena, CA, USA

SCaLE 17x

Fight, Flight, or Freeze — Releasing Organizational Trauma

When humans are faced with a traumatic experience, our brains kick in with survival mechanisms. These mechanisms are the familiar fight or flight response, but can also include the freeze response - which occurs when we are terrified or feel that there is no chance of escape.

In this talk I will explain the background of fight, flight, and freeze, and how it applies to organizations. Based on my own experiences with post-traumatic stress (PTS), I will give examples and suggestions on how to identify your own organizational trauma and how to help heal it.

Sufferers of post-traumatic stress continue to feel these fight, flight, and freeze responses long after the trauma has passed, because our brains are unable to differentiate between the memory of trauma and an actually occurring event. When activated or triggered, the brain reverts to these behaviors, which are then expressed in the person’s body (through posture, disassociation, muscle tension, etc).

The same can occur to organizations - once an organization has experienced a trauma (a large outage, say) the “memory” of that trauma leads to a deregulated state whenever activated (by symptoms of similar indicators, such as system alerts, customer issues, and more). The organization will insist on revisiting the same fight, flight, or freeze response as the embedded trauma has caused, which, like a triggered post-traumatic stress sufferer, is a false equivalency.

One of the treatments for post-traumatic stress is Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), in which the patient’s difficult memories are offset with a positive association that is reinforced through external stimuli. The same can be done for organizations - removing the inaccurate traumatic associations of previous outages and organizational pain through game days, and other techniques, we can reduce the “scar tissue” of our organization and move forward in a balanced manner.

07 March 2019

Melbourne VIC, Australia

DevOps Talks Melbourne 2019

The Four Agreements of Incident Response

Major outages, incident calls, war rooms, whatever you want to label them, can be stressful and frustrating experiences. In this talk, I will use the lessons of the book “The Four Agreements” by don Miguel Ruiz, to illustrate an easy-to-remember modality for effective and humane incident response.

Don Miguel Ruiz’s book, The Four Agreements, presents a code of personal conduct based on ancient Toltec wisdom to help remove self-limiting structures and beliefs.

Each of the Four Agreements can help us understand a more mature, effective, and humane approach to incident response in our organizations. In this talk, I will address how the Agreements can be expressed as a modality for Incident Response. Using the Agreements, it is easier to understand modern approaches to resolving incidents as effectively as possible, and even help reduce burnout as well!

21 March 2019

Auckland, New Zealand

DevOps Talks Auckland 2019

The Four Agreements of Incident Response

Major outages, incident calls, war rooms, whatever you want to label them, can be stressful and frustrating experiences. In this talk, I will use the lessons of the book “The Four Agreements” by don Miguel Ruiz, to illustrate an easy-to-remember modality for effective and humane incident response.

Don Miguel Ruiz’s book, The Four Agreements, presents a code of personal conduct based on ancient Toltec wisdom to help remove self-limiting structures and beliefs.

Each of the Four Agreements can help us understand a more mature, effective, and humane approach to incident response in our organizations. In this talk, I will address how the Agreements can be expressed as a modality for Incident Response. Using the Agreements, it is easier to understand modern approaches to resolving incidents as effectively as possible, and even help reduce burnout as well!

26 March 2019

Copenhagen, Denmark

DevOpsDays Copenhagen 2019

Fight, Flight, or Freeze — Releasing Organizational Trauma

When humans are faced with a traumatic experience, our brains kick in with survival mechanisms. These mechanisms are the familiar fight or flight response, but can also include the freeze response - which occurs when we are terrified or feel that there is no chance of escape.

In this talk I will explain the background of fight, flight, and freeze, and how it applies to organizations. Based on my own experiences with post-traumatic stress (PTS), I will give examples and suggestions on how to identify your own organizational trauma and how to help heal it.

Sufferers of post-traumatic stress continue to feel these fight, flight, and freeze responses long after the trauma has passed, because our brains are unable to differentiate between the memory of trauma and an actually occurring event. When activated or triggered, the brain reverts to these behaviors, which are then expressed in the person’s body (through posture, disassociation, muscle tension, etc).

The same can occur to organizations - once an organization has experienced a trauma (a large outage, say) the “memory” of that trauma leads to a deregulated state whenever activated (by symptoms of similar indicators, such as system alerts, customer issues, and more). The organization will insist on revisiting the same fight, flight, or freeze response as the embedded trauma has caused, which, like a triggered post-traumatic stress sufferer, is a false equivalency.

One of the treatments for post-traumatic stress is Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), in which the patient’s difficult memories are offset with a positive association that is reinforced through external stimuli. The same can be done for organizations - removing the inaccurate traumatic associations of previous outages and organizational pain through game days, and other techniques, we can reduce the “scar tissue” of our organization and move forward in a balanced manner.

03 April 2019

Chicago, IL, USA

GOTO Chicago 2019

Fight, Flight, or Freeze — Releasing Organizational Trauma

When humans are faced with a traumatic experience, our brains kick in with survival mechanisms. These mechanisms are the familiar fight or flight response, but can also include the freeze response - which occurs when we are terrified or feel that there is no chance of escape.

In this talk I will explain the background of fight, flight, and freeze, and how it applies to organizations. Based on my own experiences with post-traumatic stress (PTS), I will give examples and suggestions on how to identify your own organizational trauma and how to help heal it.

Sufferers of post-traumatic stress continue to feel these fight, flight, and freeze responses long after the trauma has passed, because our brains are unable to differentiate between the memory of trauma and an actually occurring event. When activated or triggered, the brain reverts to these behaviors, which are then expressed in the person’s body (through posture, disassociation, muscle tension, etc).

The same can occur to organizations - once an organization has experienced a trauma (a large outage, say) the “memory” of that trauma leads to a deregulated state whenever activated (by symptoms of similar indicators, such as system alerts, customer issues, and more). The organization will insist on revisiting the same fight, flight, or freeze response as the embedded trauma has caused, which, like a triggered post-traumatic stress sufferer, is a false equivalency.

One of the treatments for post-traumatic stress is Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), in which the patient’s difficult memories are offset with a positive association that is reinforced through external stimuli. The same can be done for organizations - removing the inaccurate traumatic associations of previous outages and organizational pain through game days, and other techniques, we can reduce the “scar tissue” of our organization and move forward in a balanced manner.

28 April 2019

Bloomington, MN, USA

Open Source North 2019

The Psychology of Chaos Engineering

Chaos Engineering, failure injection, and similar practices have verified benefits to the resilience of systems and infrastructure. But can they provide similar resilience to teams and people? What are the effects and impacts on the humans involved in the systems? This talk will delve into both positive and negative outcomes to all the groups of people involved - including users, engineers, product, and business owners.

Using case studies from organizations where chaos engineering has been implemented, we will explore the changes in attitude that these practices create. This talk will include a brief overview of chaos engineering practices for unfamiliar members of the audience, but the main focus will be on human elements. I will discuss successful implementations, as well as challenges faced in teams where chaos was a “success” from a technical perspective, but contained negative impact for the people involved.

After seeing this talk, attendees will have a better understanding of the human factors involved in chaos engineering, good practices to care for the people and teams working with chaos, and be even more excited about this practice.

22 May 2019